Our Service

Technology standards are typically developed and revised by a consortium of players who are experts in a given domain. These players may represent tool vendors, end-users, subject matter experts, academic institutions and government agencies. The process of developing a standard involves providing requirements, developing technical solutions, authoring specifications and driving them through a review process. Participating in such consortiums often requires significant expertise in the relevant technology domains, but also a lot of interpersonal skills including leadership, management, vision and politics. Unfortunately, not all players that are interested in a standard have staff with the right set of skills to represent them in standards bodies.

The service we offer here is to represent your interest in, or contribute on your behalf to, an existing or upcoming model based engineering standard. We can bridge the gap between your business interest in a standard and the ability to effectively contribute to it. Whether you are interested in proposing a new standard, representing a technology that you are expert in, or you want to influence an existing standard to make a change, we can help. Our experts have been contributing for many years to standards at various standards bodies like the OMG® and OASIS®.

Our Process

Our process is simple. You contact us showing interest in our standards development service, and giving us some background on the existing or new standard that you are interested in, along with your objectives and goals. Then, we reply to you confirming whether the standard falls within our areas of expertise or not. If it does, we schedule a meeting, either virtual or in person, where we discuss your requirements in more details. After we have gathered the necessary information, we send you a proposed statement of work with our services and prices. Once the payment is received, we start working on the standard on your behalf, until your objectives and goals are met.

Recent Standards

The following is a set of standards that we recently worked on:

OMG® Standards

UML®

The Unified Modeling Language (UML®) is the standard most often used in software engineering. It is a general-purpose modeling language that provides a standard way to visualize the object-oriented design of a software system, including its structure and behavior. Our experts have been contributing to the UML standard for over 10 years in various roles including co-authors, editors, and co-chairs, on behalf of IBM® (tool vendor) and JPL® (user/SME).

SysML™

The Systems Modeling Language (SysML™) is the standard most often used in systems engineering. It is a general-purpose modeling language for systems engineering applications. It supports the requirements, design and analysis activities of developing a system. Our experts have been contributing to the SysML™ standard for over 10 years in various roles including co-authors, editors, and co-chairs, on behalf of IBM® (tool vendor) and JPL® (user/SME).

MOF™ and XMI™

The Meta Object Facility (MOF™) and the XML Metadata Interchange (XMI™) are two standards that are often used in the area of model-driven engineering. MOF™ supports the specification of metamodels, which define the rules for specifying models in a specific domain. XMI™ specifies how those domain-specific models can be interchanged between modeling tools using XML. Our experts have contributed to both MOF™ and XMI™ for several years as co-authors on behalf of IBM® (tool vendor).

OCL™ and QVT™

The Object Constraint Language (OCL™) and the Query/View/Transformation (QVT™) are two standards that are often used in the area of model-driven analysis. OCL™ supports the specification of constraints, which validates models of a given domain. QVT™ supports the specification of declarative or imperative transformations of domain-specific models into other models. It leverages OCL™ as its query language. Our experts have contributed to both OCL™ and QVT™ for several years as co-authors on behalf of IBM® (tool vendor).

DD™

The Diagram Definition (DD™) is a standard used in collaboration with a domain-specific modeling language specification to specify how diagrams (visual notation) of that language are interchanged between modeling tools. Our experts have led this standard from inception (request for proposal phase) all the way through proposal, finalization and revision phases. They assumed the roles of main co-authors and editors and co-chairs of the standard on behalf of IBM® (tool vendor) and JPL® (user/SME).

OASIS® Standards

OSLC™

The Open Services for Lifecycle Collaboration (OSLC™) is a standard that enables the integration of tools that manage the application development life cycle. The intention of the specification is to make it easier for life cycle tool to work together. Our experts have contributed to this specification from inception, as co-authors on behalf of IBM® (tool vendor).

Notice: IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. UML, SysML, OCL, XMI, DD, MOF and QVT are trademarks or registered trademarks of Object Management Group, Inc in the United States and/or other countries. OSLC is a trademark of OASIS, the open standards consortium, in numerous countries. JPL is a registered trademark of California Institute of Technology in the United States.